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Puncture

In certain cases, the radiologist decides to do a puncture based on the photos or ultrasound that was done previously. A puncture is the removal of fluid, cells or tissue from the body by means of a hollow needle (puncture needle), after which the material obtained will be examined in the pathological cytological laboratory to make a diagnosis. Depending on the type of puncture and puncture site, the skin is anaesthetized before the puncture. If material can be obtained from just one single puncture, no anaesthesia will be given in advance.

If it is already clear in advance that pricking must be done several times to obtain material, the skin will be anesthetized beforehand. You feel the first shot. This is the aesthetic injection or that one injection to obtain puncture material. This test can be compared to a blood test.

The puncture will be performed by a radiologist, assisted by a radio diagnostic laboratory technician. First, the radiologist will determine the correct location of the puncture with the help of ultrasound. After this, the skin is disinfected. If necessary, you will receive an aesthetic injection. After anaesthesia, an opening of a few millimetres is sometimes made. The puncture then takes place. The radiologist follows where the needle is going under ultrasound guidance. If necessary, the puncture will be repeated a number of times to obtain sufficient tissue.

If sufficient material has been obtained, the investigation is complete. The pathologist examines whether the tissue is benign or malignant.

The puncture examination is done directly at our location by the radiologist. We will schedule the treatment as soon as possible in consultation with you.

Side effects and risks

If you use blood thinning medicines or have a clotting problem, you must report this to the radiologist before the puncture.

After the examination (after the puncture)

Afterwards a patch is stuck on the puncture site. A bruise may develop, especially if a number of consecutive punctures have occurred. If the anaesthesia has worked out and you are in pain, you may take acetaminophen, not aspirin and ibuprofen.

We advise you to wear a sturdy bra immediately after the puncture if you have one. Wear this if necessary during day and night.

The outcome

The tissue obtained through a puncture is taken to the pathology laboratory. The tissue will then be examined.

The result will be available after approximately 48 hours. Any further treatment and the preparation of a treatment plan is done in collaboration with the hospital. We will schedule any further treatment as soon as possible in consultation with you.